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Latest health and behavior news and advice from the veterinarians at Tufts University.

November 2019

Full Issue (PDF)

November 2019 - Full Issue PDFSubscribers Only

Features

How Safe For Your Dog Are Essential Oils In Household Products?Subscribers Only

Your new diffuser emits the calming scent of lavender, your counters and floors gleam from a cleanser suffused with the uplifting odor of peppermint, and youíre thinking of placing clove potpourri in the bedroom. But did you know that products like these, all made pleasing with the aromas of essential oils that have taken off in consumer use, could be toxic to your dog, and in some cases even lead to life-threatening reactions?   More...

Treats for the Dog with Kidney DiseaseSubscribers Only

Itís very possible that a renal (kidney) diet is in your dogís future. Kidney disease is one of the most common illnesses of aging canines, with more than one in 10 pets developing it at some point, usually when theyíre older.   More...

Getting Your Dog Over “the Hump”Subscribers Only

Many people have a strong negative reaction to seeing dogs humping. They interpret it as a sign of sexual aggression. And if itís their own dog doing the humping, they feel embarrassed by it, as if itís somehow a reflection on them. They start yelling at their pet and trying to pull it off the other dog, which backfires because dogs like attention ó even negative attention ó and your strong reaction could only prove positive reinforcement for the behavior. So what should you do?   More...

Your Dog As a Blood DonorSubscribers Only

If a large dog like a Lab or a golden retriever is rushed to the emergency room after getting hit by a car, he might need four or five units of blood in just a couple of hours. Even a dog who gets heat stroke might need two to four units of plasma (the watery component of blood) before stabilizing. A dog who experiences bleeding complications during an operation is going to need blood, too. Where does all this extra blood come from?   More...

News & Views

Their Stress Levels Mirror Ours

Itís no secret that dogs are intensely aware of our moods. Now itís clear that our stress levels literally course through their veins. Investigators reporting in Scientific Reports found the connection upon examining hair from more than 50 people and their dogs. Hair follicles absorb cortisol, a stress hormone released into the bloodstream.   More...

The Most Earth-Friendly Ways to Dispose of Your Dog’s Poop

The unfortunate truth is that even if you use truly biodegradable poop bags proven to break down and return to nature in a relatively short period of time, they will not degrade well in a landfill, where compression and lack of oxygen get in the way of the degradation process. So instead of throwing your poop bags in the regular trash, what can you do to go the extra ecological mile?   More...

Dear Doctor: Droopy tail

My 9-year old Maltese, Maggie, has had a droopy tail for a few months. She is also very protective of her ďrearĒ and tail area and yipes occasionally when touched there, or even sometimes when I pick her up. She also suffers from low-grade kidney disease, for which she has been taking benazepril and aluminum hydroxide. Aside from the droopy tail and yiping, her activity level is normal. She still jumps, runs, eats, poops, and urinates fine. Her anal glands were cleared, and she had a rectal exam. My vet felt it may be a nerve issue and prescribed gabapentin. So far, no change. Any thoughts?   More...