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Latest health and behavior news and advice from the veterinarians at Tufts University.

If The Dog Is Fat, Is the Cancer Prognosis Worse?

If The Dog Is Fat, Is the Cancer Prognosis Worse?

Looking at markers for cancer survival.

August 2016 - It has already been well established that people who are obese are more likely to develop cancer than people of healthy weight. “There are a lot of different theories on why,” says Tufts veterinary nutritionist Cailin Heinze, VMD, DACVM. “One of the main ones,” she comments, “is that obesity is a chronic inflammatory condition. It’s thought that some inflammatory chemical triggers that shouldn’t normally be floating around in your bloodstream in relatively high amounts could set things in motion by causing changes in cells that lead to the growth of malignant tumors.”

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High Cholesterol, High Triglycerides: They’re Different For Dogs

High Cholesterol, High Triglycerides: They’re Different For Dogs

What high fat levels mean for our canine friends.

So much of what heart disease is about for people concerns the arteries becoming clogged with “gunk” because of a diet that’s high in saturated fat and cholesterol. The unhealthful diet translates to high amounts of cholesterol in the blood (and sometimes triglycerides), and this means arteries filling with plaques and narrowing over time until one of them becomes too narrow to allow blood to flow, resulting in a heart attack. The process leading up to the heart attack is called atherosclerosis.

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8 Canine Behaviors You Think Are Weird or Annoying

8 Canine Behaviors You Think Are Weird or Annoying

But your dog has his reasons.

Sniffing the butts of other dogs, sniffing the groins of other people, going nuts when the mailman comes, day after day — these are just some of the behaviors your dog might engage in that you find embarrassing, annoying, or perhaps just plain weird. But one species’ weirdness is another’s perfectly normal way of getting on in the world. Herein, to bridge the gap between what they do and what you perceive as out-there…

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Treating Urinary Continence in Older Female Dogs

Treating Urinary Continence in Older Female Dogs

Diagnosing and treating urinary incontinence.

We once had a client who thought he was causing his dog to urinate in the house because she was picking up on his anxiety and depression. The man had lost his job and thought maybe his best “girl” was responding to his mood and therefore not even bothering to wait to pee until she got outside. …

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