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Latest health and behavior news and advice from the veterinarians at Tufts University.

Fear of Fireworks

Fear of Fireworks

Strategies for keeping your pet calm during the sound and light "storm."

July 2019 - These are the times that try dogs’ souls — if they suffer from noise phobia, that is, which many dogs do. The booms of July 4th fireworks leave them panting, pacing, drooling, shaking, barking, and running for cover. What can you do about it?

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Which Imaging Technique Is Right for Your Dog?

Which Imaging Technique Is Right for Your Dog?

A guide to x-rays, ultrasound, CT scans, MRI, and nuclear medicine.

Veterinarians often need to see inside a sick or injured dog to figure out what’s wrong. But what’s the best imaging technique to use? It depends on what the veterinarian suspects might be the problem. What follows is a guide to the various ways doctors view what’s happening under the coat. As you’ll see, the cost of imaging is a good reason to have pet health insurance.

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Juanita Pignataro

Acupuncture for What Ails Him?

For relief from arthritis, disc disease, nausea, and other conditions, acupuncture gains ground.

Acupuncture treatment, by many accounts, is proving valuable in treating dogs suffering from such ailments as musculoskeletal pain and nausea as well as various side effects of chemotherapy. Tufts veterinary school graduate Karen Fine, DVM, who practices in Massachusetts, describes one dog who was in so much pain from apparent disc disease in his neck that she told his owners if acupuncture didn’t help, and they declined to take him for a workup by veterinary specialists, they should seriously consider putting him down to relieve him of his misery.

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Why an Older Dog Might Be a Better Choice

Why an Older Dog Might Be a Better Choice

For many households, puppies do not make the best pets.

While a brand new car has its attractions, many people have found that a car with some mileage on it runs just as well, has had the kinks worked out, and costs a lot less than a new vehicle. So it goes with dogs. A mature dog usually has plenty of life left. In addition, the behavioral kinks have likely been taken care of, and a mature dog often costs a lot less than a 2- to 3-month-old puppy. The advantages break down as follows.

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