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Latest health and behavior news and advice from the veterinarians at Tufts University.

When Mites Get Too Mighty

When Mites Get Too Mighty

A new medicine cures a disease of mites more safely and effectively.

July 2017 - Say “mites,” and many people think “mange,” a highly contagious disease often referred to as scabies or sarcoptic mange. Caused by a species of mite known as Sarcoptes scabiei, it occurs when the microscopic animals burrow through a dog’s skin, causing severe itching and irritation. Treatment consists of oral and/or topical drugs that kill the mites, with the dog perhaps being dipped in a medicated shampoo. Ongoing treatment over the course of several weeks is critical, as the drugs kill only living mites, not eggs that haven’t hatched yet. The eggs need to mature so the continued drug administration can take care of that next generation of mites, too.

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When You’re Out With Your Dog, Are You Dialed In?

When You’re Out With Your Dog, Are You Dialed In?

Just because youre on a walk together doesnt mean youre really connecting.

When our son John was just a year old, he loved to walk atop a low stone wall in front of the old parish house around the corner. I’d lift him up and hold his hand as he threaded his way along, delighted at the novelty of walking “high” off the ground and pleased with his competence at being able to stay afoot on the relatively narrow ledge.

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Dog Food

Improve Your Picky Eater’s Diet

A dog doesnt have to be too thin to be a poor eater. Plenty of picky eaters are overweight. Too thin or too heavy, there are strategies for enticing dogs who eat too little, or too little of the right foods.

It’s not just cats. Some dogs turn up their noses at food, too, worrying their “parents” that they’re not taking in enough calories — or won’t unless they’re fed more enticing fare. Are these picky eaters born that way, or molded that way by their owners?

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Dog and Garden

How Does Your Dog's Garden Grow?

Creating a garden that looks good but allows your dog to enjoy it, too.

You like peonies; your dog likes peeing. You dig asters; your dog digs, period. You stop and smell the roses; your dog sniffs what decomposes. How can you and your canine pal possibly enjoy the same garden? It would be great if you could, because time outside with you is time not spent waiting indoors for something more exciting to happen.

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