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Thinking of choosing a new veterinarian? If so, one of the first considerations should be whether you prefer a large practice or small. Small practice benefits: Your dog will see the same doctor - or two - every single visit and will therefore develop a bond with the vet and feel less scared about going for medical care. The atmosphere will be less harried. The vet will have intimate knowledge of your dogs baseline health and will be in…
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To continue reading this article or issue you must be a paid subscriber

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Go to a Large Veterinary Practice Or Small?

Thinking of choosing a new veterinarian? If so, one of the first considerations should be whether you prefer a large practice or small. Small practice benefits: Your dog will see the same doctor - or two - every single visit and will therefore develop a bond with the vet and feel less scared about going for medical care. The atmosphere will be less harried. The vet will have intimate knowledge of your dogs baseline health and will be in…
To continue reading this article or issue you must be a paid subscriber

Subscribe to Tufts Your Dog

Get the next year of Tufts Your Dog for just $20. And access all of our online content - over 1,000 articles - free of charge.
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What to Do When Your Dogs Aggression is Directed At You

It used to be called dominance behavior. A dog growls if his owner goes to pick up one of his toys, or steps into space the pet considers his and his alone. But today, animal behaviorists call that kind of deportment conflict aggression, with the understanding the dog is not trying to exert dominance over his human caretaker but, rather, feels inner conflict about whos the leader in the household. Hes actually anxious and worried that hes unprotected and feels he must step up to take care of himself. Its akin to a four-year-old who acts out because he hasnt had the proper structure, guidance, and limits to feel secure.
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Why Dog Diets Fail

The reason efforts to slim down an overweight dog often fail is not because of a nutrition problem like too many calories per serving. Rather, most dogs have weight problems because of emotional issues - yours, not theirs.
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No Longer Legal in the U.S.: Dogs as Food for People

Many tend to think of consumption of dog meat as something still going on only in undeveloped, far-off nations. But the import, export, and slaughter of dogs (and cats) has been legal in 44 states.
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A Womans Best Sleeping Partner

With which of these three animals do women get the best nights sleep: a dog, a cat, or a person? A dog, according to a survey of 962 women across the U.S. whose results were published in the journal Anthrozoos.
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At an Airport Terminal Near You – Dogs to Pet and Ease Your Travel...

The delays, the people in Zone 4 trying to get ahead of you during boarding, the sterile atmosphere, the fear of flying…there are all kinds of reasons not to like waiting for your flight to take off. But what if you could pet or cuddle with a friendly dog to take your mind off the tedium and anxiety? At more and more airports, you can. Around the U.S. and Canada, airports have been instituting programs whereby people come and walk their friendly, well-behaved dogs around the terminal to soothe travelers strung-out souls.
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An End to Excessive Barking

Up to one in seven dog owners identifies excessive barking as a concern, says the American Veterinary Medical Association. Barking dogs also constitute the majority of animal-related complaints in some locales, the organization says. And the complaints can get legal, leading to eviction proceedings and other actions.
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March 2019 – Full Issue PDF

March 2019 - Full Issue PDF
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Dear Doctor: Why has the dog started urinating in the house?

My three-year-old, 10-pound Malti-poo (half Maltese terrier, half miniature poodle), Teddy, has started leaving little drops of urine around the house. I let him out in the morning, and he does his business beautifully, and I also let him out at night, when he also does what he has to. My husband is so upset about this new behavior that he is ready to give the dog up. Please help.
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Nail Trimming 101

Tufts veterinarians see more than their fair share of pups whose owners havent trimmed their nails - in the emergency room. The nails have grown in a circular shape and back into the dogs paw pads, causing painful infections that turn red and ooze pus.
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