DOG HEALTH AND MEDICINE

The right number of calories fed will translate to the right number on the scale.

Yes, But How Many Calories, Exactly?

Many people wonder just how many calories their dog should consume. With an estimated 40 percent of dogs in this country who weigh more than they should, it’s a reasonable question. The good news: once your veterinarian confirms your suspicion that your dog is too plump, there are a couple of different ways to arrive […]
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Swallowing Foreign Objects: Theres Dangerous, And Very Dangerous

Dogs will literally swallow almost anything, says Your Dog editor-in-chief John Berg, DVM. A veterinary surgeon at Tufts Universitys Foster Hospital for Small Animals, he has retrieved from dogs GI tracts such items as pantyhose, golf balls, socks, rocks, underwear, plastic gadgets, and magnets.

Tis the Season — for Pancreatitis

At Thanksgiving and Christmastime (not to mention Easter), the Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Tufts University sees a surge in cases of very sick dogs who have lost their appetite and are often vomiting as well as having bouts of diarrhea. Moreover, their abdomens are extremely sensitive to touch; any pressure causes pain. The […]
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The Least Likely Place Your Dog Will Get Kennel Cough: A Kennel

Kennel cough is the lay term for an upper respiratory tract infection caused by a type of bacteria called Bordetella bronchiseptica. Because the bacteria are airborne and the illness highly contagious, kennels have gotten a reputation for spreading it among dogs. But a kennel is probably the least likely place a dog would be exposed […]
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dog with arthritis

CBD Holds Promise of Pain Relief for Dogs with Arthritis

A small and preliminary but high-quality study shows that dogs afflicted with osteoarthritis may experience pain relief, a better ability to get around, and mood improvement by consuming CBD, or cannabidiol. CBD is a component of cannabis that does not produce a “high.” In collaboration with researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Medterra CBD, […]
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Four in 10 Great Dane puppies will grow up to suffer a painful, life-threatening disease unless they undergo a particular elective surgery.

Elective Surgeries Seriously Worth Considering

If your dog has a cancerous tumor on his spleen and will die unless it is surgically removed, the operation is clearly a medical necessity. But there are a couple of surgeries we commonly perform at Tufts to prevent disease and other problems rather than treat them. Thus, they are considered elective procedures. Here’s a […]
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Your Dog As a Blood Donor

If a large dog like a Lab or a golden retriever is rushed to the emergency room after getting hit by a car, he might need four or five units of blood in just a couple of hours. Even a dog who gets heat stroke might need two to four units of plasma (the watery component of blood) before stabilizing. A dog who experiences bleeding complications during an operation is going to need blood, too. Where does all this extra blood come from?

Do heart problems mean the dog can’t be treated under anesthesia for dental pain?

Q. I rescued an 11-year-old cavalier King Charles spaniel with dental issues. Her breath would melt glass…real bad. But more than that, I cannot brush her teeth or approach her mouth at all. Although her appetite remains good and she seems generally happy, when I go to touch her mouth to take care of her […]
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Digitizing Your Dog for Medical Evaluation — and Fun!

To create digitized versions of dogs and other animals for use in film and video games, the entertainment industry has to use an expensive technique called motion capture technology. It requires multiple cameras and highly specialized equipment. Now, computer scientists at CAMERA — the Centre for the Analysis of Motion, Entertainment Research and Applications at […]
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Dear Doctor: Rabies shot even for a dog always leashed?

Q. I know that dogs can get rabies from an infected animal. But I always keep my little shiba inu on a leash. She never got the hang of coming when I call, so she stays tethered to me whenever we go out. I was wondering if we could skip the rabies shot for that […]
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Virtual veterinary visits

Veterinary Visits By Video

Back in December 2019, before anyone had ever heard the term “social distancing,” telemedicine remained largely at the margins of veterinary care. The concept of providing medical services to a pet without an in-person visit was out there, to be sure. The American Veterinary Medical Association even had guidelines for the use of technology such […]
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Woman Write Plans In The Notebook With Her Jack Russel Terrier

Getting to the Bottom of Your Pet’s Sensitive Tummy

“She has a sensitive stomach” is a common refrain heard by veterinarians. People want to know why their otherwise healthy dog vomits or has diarrhea or flatulence on a not-infrequent basis. The symptoms are not life-threatening or even terribly severe. The dog soon returns to herself. But owners are rightfully concerned. And food manufacturers are […]
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